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Original documents > Autopsies
Eric Harris / Dylan Klebold · Columbine High School
Dylan Klebold’s Autopsy Report [8 pp, 345 Kb]

Though Klebold drank alcohol and smoked marijuana, the autopsy noted no trace of drugs or alcohol; thus, he was not under the influence at the time of the attack. The report also documents the clothing he wore, including a black t-shirt with the word “Wrath” on it, as well as a “red star medallion containing a sickle and a hammer” on his left boot—a symbol used in Communist Russia.

Eric Harris’s Autopsy Report [9 pp, 333 Kb]

Despite Harris’s use of marijuana and alcohol, the autopsy revealed no substances in his system other than fluvoxamine (Luvox), a prescription medication he had been taking for approximately a year. The report also notes that he wore a shirt that read “Natural Selection.” Finally, Harris had a medical condition called pectus excavatum, which means he had a sunken chest. He had surgery at ages 12 and 13 to repair this. Despite the surgery, the autopsy notes that the pectus excavatum was still observable.

Marc Lépine · École Polytechnique
Marc Lépine's Coroner’s Report [62 pp, 142 Kb]

This is not an autopsy report (though it does note that the autopsy found no trace of drugs or alcohol), but a comprehensive document including information regarding the perpetrator, his preliminary visits to the university, his actions during the attack, and the details of the emergency response.

Myron May · Florida State University
Myron May's Autopsy Report [25 pp, 14 Mb]

This includes a general evaluation of his medical condition, details about his multiple gunshot wounds, and notes that he had amphetamines in his system.

Duane Morrison · Platte Canyon High School
Duane Morrison's Autopsy Report [16 pp, 871 Kb]

The autopsy notes a trace amount of opiates in Morrison’s urine, though the blood screen was negative for any prescription or illegal drugs. Also, the autopsy notes gunshot wounds that Morrison sustained prior to the self-inflicted shot to his head that resulted in his death. 

Charles Whitman · University of Texas
Charles Whitman’s Autopsy Report [3 pp, 118 Kb]

Whitman's autopsy is notable because it found a brain tumor and there has been significant speculation regarding the potential role of this tumor in Whitman's violent behavior. The autopsy says of the tumor, “no correlation with psychosis.” Whitman's biographer, Gary Lavergne, writing in 1997 commented, “in the past thirty years nearly all of the physicians and criminologists who have made themselves familiar with the case have pronounced the tumor ‘innocent'” (p. 268).